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Year 9: Humans' Use of Energy

Humans' Use of Energy

Claims

Cover ArtAustralia's energy debate (Ebook)

CLAIM: Nuclear power plants are a better choice than pump hydroelectricity plants

PART A: Relevant Scientific Information

Nuclear Power Plants

Pumped Hydroelectricity Plants

PART B: Explanation of Reasons For and Against the Claim

CLAIM: By mid-century, solar-powered cars will be more popular than electric cars

PART A: Relevant Scientific Information‚Äč
Solar Cars 
NOTE: 
There are 2 kinds of solar-powered cars, so you need to think about the challenges / efficiencies of both:

Electric Cars 

PART B: Explanation of Reasons For and Against the Claim

Cover ArtAustralia's energy debate (Ebook)

Planning Sheet for Claims

Write bullet points to support both sides of your claim in this planning sheet, and use it to prepare Part B of your assignment.

Research Tips Middle School Science

QUT C.R.A.A.P. Test for Evaluating Websites

Check the quality of your websites using these criteria (adapted from QUT Library):

Currency: Timeliness of the information

  • When was the information published, posted or last updated?
  • Is the information current for your topic and field of study? How recent does it have to be? Can older sources work just as well?
Relevance: Importance of the information for your needs
  • Is the information appropriate for a senior secondary course?
  • Is this an adequately in-depth examination or a quick summary of the topic?
  • Who's the intended audience? Is it the general public, a student, a researcher or industry?
  • Is the level of information too basic or too advanced for your needs?

Authority: Source of the information

  • Is the author/authoring body (individual person, or institution, or organisation) established and reputable?
  • Are their qualifications, credentials, expertise, experience, educational background and previous work (if any) relevant and do they add credibility to the source?
  • Has the piece been published by a well-known and respected publisher or organisation?
  • Do references to other sources support the writing ie is a Bibliography or Reference List provided?

Accuracy: Reliability and correctness of the information

  • Where does the information come from, and is it supported by evidence?
  • Does it have a Reference List or Bibliography so you can easily find and verify the sources used?
  • Are there any spelling, grammar, or other typographical errors?

Purpose: Reason the information exists

  • What is the purpose of the information? Why was it written?
  • Does the point of view appear objective, unbiased and impartial?
  • Is the viewpoint of the author's affiliation/ sponsors reflected in the message or content?
  • Does the author acknowledge alternative versions of the issues or facts?

What is a Claim?

According to the QCAA Syllabus glossary, a claim is an assertion made without any accompanying evidence to support it.

Developing a Research Question From a Claim

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Example of Developing a Research Question From a Claim (From Year 11 Earth Science QCAA syllabus page)

CLAIM: Climate change will make extreme weather events more frequent.
RESEARCH QUESTION: What effect does climate change have on the frequency of cyclones crossing the Queensland coast?

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Template Sheet for QUT's C.R.A.A.P. Test Evaluation of Sources Used

Choose the sources you wish to evaluate. Save this document to your tablet, complete the evaluation of the sources (one per page) and print out to attach to the back of your assignment.

How To Write In-Text References for Science

How to Write A List of References (End-Text References) Using the CiteAce Program

ONESearch

The ENTIRE collection of resources provided by the BBC Library can now be searched on ONE single, powerful search platform, which retrieves print books, eBooks, database articles and websites. Click HERE for assistance.

Useful Databases

Useful Journals

Australia's Energy Debate - Ebook

Useful Academic Websites

An American website that aggregates press releases and publishes lightly edited press releases about science.

Advanced Google Web Searching

Google Advanced search techniques

1. You can complete an advanced search in Google Advanced Search, which helps narrow or refine your search for better, more specific results.

2.  Narrow your results to one particular domain type, by adding site: and a domain name to your search terms.

  • Looking for an educational site -  genetic engineering site:edu
  • Looking for a government site - genetic engineering site:gov
  • To restrict your search to Australian websites, add '.au' -  genetic engineering site:edu.au

3 letter Domain names

  • gov - Government 
  • go -  some countries such as Indonesia use .go only
  • edu - Educational 
  • org - Organizations (nonprofit)
  • mil -  Military
  • com - commercial
  • net - Network organizations

2 letter Domain names for country of origin
 

  • au - Australia
  • uk - United Kingdom
  • cn - China
  • in - India
  • id - Indonesia

A complete list can be found on the CIA World Factbook

3. Use 'Ctrl F' (Control + Find) to search for particular terms easily in a long document, whether from a website or a database article.

4. Use a Google command to limit results to the MOST RECENT: After you get your results, choose the Google Menu Bar, and choose 'Tools'. Then on the far left, at the drop-down menu next to 'Any Time', .you can choose 'Within the last year' (or less, if you prefer), but generally, you can choose 'Custom Range' at the bottom, as often the last 3 to 5 years would be sufficient for a recent search.

5. Use Boolean searching

  • Use double inverted commas ("...") to enclose a phrase eg "plastic pollution". This command forces Google to return results where these 2 words are exactly side by side.
  • Use AND to limit your results: A search for this phrase - Australian AND Indonesian "plastic pollution" will force Google to return results where both Australian and Indonesian plastic pollution is mentioned in the same article.
  • Use NOT to limit your results (in a different way): A search for this - "plastic pollution" NOT marine - will force Google to return results about plastic pollution which do not include anything related to the ocean.
  • Use OR to expand your results: A search for this - global OR worldwide "plastic pollution" - will force Google to return results for global as well as its synonym worldwide.
  • Use filetype:pdf to search in Google for only pdf articles - "plastic pollution" filetype:pdf - will force Google to return results on plastic pollution which are only pdf articles (PDFs are great sources sometimes deeply buried in Google results and remain unseen).